Culture Shock, flash fiction by Jane Boch (MY SWEET WORD Series)

I love this piece so much that I need to re-blog it! This is a fantastic piece of flash fiction! Thanks for sharing, Jane Boch, and Silver Birch Press. 🙂

Silver Birch Press

japanese pastry

Culture Shock
by Jane Boch

Carla no longer trusted chocolate. Her bite into the filled pastry contorted her face with sourness and disappointment.

“Bean paste,” Evan said, laughing.

Carla forced a swallow. “You knew?” she accused.

Carla would be in Japan for three weeks. She hoped this trip would propel her into an engagement with Evan, a U.S. Naval Officer, or prompt them to end the long-distance relationship. She couldn’t imagine marrying a man whose career demanded replacing chocolate with the gooey pastiness of mung beans.

A walk in Evan’s hilltop neighborhood led Carla to an overlook of the bay. Turning from the water view, she glimpsed a sign picturing a loaf of bread. Inside the shop, the fragrance of freshly baked goods, arranged on racks lining the walls, reminded her of the bakery in her hometown. She asked, “Sweet?” while pointing at a croissant topped with sugar.

The baker…

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When

What a great micro-read to start the week with…

Oblong

 

By David Bussell

 

When the waiter poured the man’s wine and offered a casual ‘Say when,’ the man did no such thing.

Instead he watched, steadfast as the wine filled the glass, until eventually it found the rim and overflowed onto the tablecloth. The waiter cocked an eyebrow as if to say ‘Play fair, sir, say when,’ but the man remained staunch as the wine cascaded off the sides of the table, soaking the carpet and pooling at their feet.

Soon the wine collected around their ankles, then their shins, and still the man said nothing. Sweat beaded the waiter’s brow as the wine flooded to the edges of the restaurant and began pressing at the windowpanes. Say when, the waiter’s eyes screamed. For God’s sake say when! The bottle faltered in his hand but still the man said nothing, so still the wine flowed.

There was a…

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Doubt, Fear, False Alarms & “Giving Birth” To Our Dreams

What encouraging writing words of wisdom to read on such a gloomy Monday !

Kristen Lamb's Blog

If you’re a writer, then you have a dream. You also have a lot of work ahead. I heard an interesting quote this morning from Joyce Meyers. There are dreamers who don’t work and workers who don’t dream. That hit home for me.

After having been around the block a few times, I can say I’ve met both types of writers. Some writers have all these ideas and generally a stack of unfinished work to show for it. They aren’t willing to dig in when it gets hard, when the “fair-weather friends” fall away. On the other side, we have those who write, but are afraid to dream. They’re terrified to dare ask if they could be great.

To be successful we must learn to dream and to be finishers.Starting is easy. There are a lot of people to cheer us on, but watch what happens when the…

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Adding words into your child’s daily life…

A couple of years back, I decided to add a “word board” to our already cluttered kitchen wall, sort of a visual prompt to gaze upon over a bowl of morning cereal. Although, I was still reading aloud nightly to my children(and still do!), it wasn’t enough to combat the increasing infiltration of electronics that were insidiously creeping not only into our home, but the school as well. So, with a discarded, glass-less frame and a purchased roll of dry-erase backing, I made the board you see here for less than five bucks.

IMG_7779

I began by adding or updating two or three words weekly. It wasn’t long before I was adding meaningful quotes, mantras or Scripture in an attempt to foster kindness, empathy and other attributes amongst my children. (For a short time I added a Spanish word-of-the-week, but this didn’t go over so well.)Their level of philosophical contemplation and discussion is not mind-blowing, but it is often engaging and sometimes near the mark. Regardless, they are thinking!

Honestly, my kids seem indifferent to the board, but have come to expect it to be updated regularly, and do go along with me sporadically asking for an explanation to a word’s implication, or the underlining thought behind a quote. Of course, they do not recall the meaning of every word that has been presented(I don’t expect this), but many words, especially those words that we’ve made everyday connections with, have become part of their vocabulary. And that, makes it so worth it!

What’s the all-time favorite word-board word? Insolent: it is heard quite often 😉